Taro Leaf balls and Spaghetti

My family has been growing Taro for over 100 years now. In Hindi it’s called Arbi , I have also heard people call it Guhiya. Here is picture of our Taro farm, in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India,  about 250 KM from Delhi.

My first culinary experience with Taro leaves was during summer vacation at my grandmother’s place. She used to spend whole afternoon, intricately cleaning and layering leaves with gram flour , to make fried dumplings, which were then cooked with most amazing spice combination.

I used to watch whole process from outside kitchen door as entering kitchen was tougher  that entering class-1 clean room environment, you were suppose to wash your hand and feet, wipe them dry and not touch anything else on the way.

In America , Hawaii, has significant history Taro with cultural importance as well. It’s a staple snack in any Gujarati American house. Usually , leaves available in Indian Grocery stores are bruised  or discolored, I was lucky to find some good quality leaves in Jackson Heights, NY.

I obviously wanted them to prepare in a healthy way , so frying was not an option, so I thought about steaming them. To give you a background on my craze about steaming. Topic of steaming came-up during a culinary discussions with my mother on the phone, where I told her about Burmese tofu and to my surprise she told me it’s her favorite snack from her childhood, her grandmother used to make a tofu like preparation from homemade Gram Floor (details in future post).

 

Taro Farm owned by our family in India

 

Taro leaf
Taro leaf from Indian Store in Jackson Height’s,  New York
Gram Flour with salt, green pepper, ginger, cumin , coriander powder
Gram Flour with salt, green pepper, ginger, cumin , coriander powder

 

Clean and chop Taro Leaves. Chop them as small as possible.
Clean and chop Taro Leaves. Chop them as small as possible.
Mix and kneed gram flour and leaves with some water. Resulting dough should be firm and smooth.
Mix and kneed gram flour and leaves with some water. Resulting dough should be firm and smooth.

 

Make small round balls, and keep them on steamer.  Here I am using the old school methods of steaming using a sieve.
Make small round balls, and keep them on steamer. Here I am using the old school methods of steaming using a sieve.

 

Closeup of the Taro balls.
Closeup of the Taro balls ,cooking over closed steamer for about 30 mins.

 

Cooked Taro balls , cutting them with knife will not leave a stain.
Cooked Taro balls , cutting them with knife will not leave a stain.
Cook in marinara sauce for 15 - 20 mins and server over hot spaghetti.
Cook in marinara sauce for 15 – 20 mins and server over hot spaghetti.
Enjoy a low-carb, high protein sumptuous  meal.
Enjoy a low-carb, high protein sumptuous meal.

 

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